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June 02, 2006

Disability Movement and Inner Eugenic Thought: A Philosophical Aspect of Independent Living and Bioethics: Comments

The following are comments on "Disability Movement and Inner Eugenic Thought: A Philosophical Aspect of Independent Living and Bioethics" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

___________________________________________

The following page refers to this paper:
http://listas.cev.org.br/pipermail/cevama/2005-August.txt

By Masahiro_Morioka, at 2:08 AM, December 17, 2005

What do We Learn from Japanese Feminist Bioethics?

The following are comments to "What do We Learn from Japanese Feminist Bioethics? " in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

___________________________________________

I have written a blog essay that expresses a somewhat similar point of view in English:

Part I: http://ambivablog.typepad.com/ambivablog/2005/01/note_this_essay.html

Part II: http://ambivablog.typepad.com/ambivablog/2005/03/the_ambivaborti.html

Thank you.

By amba, at 4:05 AM, March 10, 2005

The Ethics of Human Cloning and the Sprout of Human Life: Comments

The following are comments on "The Ethics of Human Cloning and the Sprout of Human Life" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.


 

The Insensitive Man: A Philosophical Essay on Male Sexuality: Comments

The following are comments on "The Insensitive Man: A Philosophical Essay on Male Sexuality (2005) " in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

___________________________________________
  • By Masahiro_Morioka, at 6:52 PM, June 20, 2005  

  • By Masahiro_Morioka, at 1:38 AM, July 12, 2005  

  • I don't know how I missed this one when I've been here before, but BRAVO for speaking up on the subject how our sexual fetishes and fantasies shape our lives.

    I would like to say, first of all, that miniskirts for me are one of the biggest turn-ons as well and am so happy to be offered this opportunity to let it out, regardless of what others might think. But I think miniskirts turn me on for a different reason.

    Living in the US, where most people are out of shape, not a lot of women wear miniskirts because of issues they have with their appearance. Of course, many would not wear them under any circumstances, no matter what they look like. And there are some who will wear them and not worry about the fact that they are architecturally compatible.

    It is not common dress, I think, because of the stigma attached to the physical appearance. Occasionally more mature women in business will use them to manipulate men on a genetic/cellular level.

    I used to have a friend I loved to visit with, because she wore a lot of them. She would go on and on about her issues, and I would keep the conversation going just to watch her in her miniskirt. I'd go shopping with her just to watch her try them on etc. I'm embarassed to talk about that being married with children now.

    When a woman is wearing a miniskirt there is a certain nuance of style and gesture that makes them appear as if they have transcended the problems that beset the physical body, like a fakir walking on fire. They are doing something that fear stops other women from doing.

    In other words, a miniskirt can be a talisman worn by a woman to show she is superior to her peers. And from that standpoint I get aroused by miniskirts because I feel they are symbols of transcendental being, unaffected by biology or philosophy. Not necessarily something pure, but something strong and free.

    The miniskirt was designed, however, for slim and young women, and somehow reminds me of a woman wearing a man’s shirt or sweater after sex, which is another turn on. On the other hand, they started as dancing clothes, which basically make them packaging for women attending modern mating rituals, just as young men’s suits and jackets are designed to exaggerate their biological-role features. The mini says to my hormones “this woman is available for mating” and to my mind "she is not confusing".

    The young and slim idea does represent a certain vulnerability, but we don't have the kind of school uniforms that we see in Manga/Anime. I know them mostly through the designs of Anna Sui and Betsy Johnson and other fashion designers. They have, at times, caused me to doubt my own pro-feminist ethics. But I think that I have begun to come to terms with these waves of 'misknowledge' that screw around with my internal chemistry.

    By Roy Kirkland, at 5:43 PM, July 20, 2005  

  • Thank you Roy for your excellent comment on mini skirts. I didn't talk about that aspect in my book, but it is interesting indeed. I regret that my analysis of mini skirts in Chapter 1 was somewhat shallow. However, Chapter 2 and subsequent chapters are more interesting, so please look forward to them.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 10:17 PM, July 20, 2005  

  • By Masahiro_Morioka, at 12:55 AM, August 05, 2005  

  • By Masahiro_Morioka, at 6:57 PM, December 02, 2005  

  • What I miss in this article is a distiction about ejaculation while having looked at pornography and ejaculation after a lovingful moment of whatever how many minutes with a person you love. In other words, I believe in a philosofical part of orgasm, which is absolutely not there while looking at pornography. There is e great difference in orgasm while having looked at porn-pics or movies and experiencing orgasm with someone you love.
    I am not sure that all men grow the same attitude towards orgasm (or sex for that matter) through pornography. I myself do not think I have changed much over the years in that aspect, but you should ask my wife that question. Nor has my way of looking at, or ideas about love, which has always been a bit of a struggle.
    The real talk should be about that difference, but I am not planning to tell much more about my point of view in this subject, here on the internet. Yet I think that there should be dome some real research, and I wouldn't mind to participate.

    Funny where dutch weblogs bring you... (-

    greetings

  • By Paul Bernhard, at 6:28 AM, December 09, 2005  

  • Ejaculation with porn is hollow and empty, true. Ejaculation inside your wife, whom you cherish and love more than anything in the world, is truly bliss. I wouldn't trade it for anything. Joel

    By Anonymous, at 4:41 PM, February 12, 2006  

  • Interesting discussion is going on at:
    http://www.twcenter.net/forums/showthread.php?t=47031

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 2:27 PM, March 31, 2006   

  • Hi! My internet name is Keenagain, and I am a doctor of medicine from scandinavia. I read the two first chapters of your book, "The Insensitive Man ". I just felt like leaving a comment here, as I found it very interesting reading. Although you are talking about your own experiences, I think a lot of people , including my self have a lot of the same thoughts as you do on these topics. I am waiting with great anticipation for the following chapters of your book! I hope that it will be possible to one day buy the hardcopy of the english version. The thoughts you are describing were as if you had taken them straight out of my mind! Continue the good work! Regards,Keenagain

    By keenagain, at 12:25 AM, August 25, 2005  

  • Thank you, keenagain! I am very happy to hear your heartfelt comment on my book. In Japan there have been many comments and book reviews on this book since publication, and many of them were affirmative ones about the author's basic point of view. Your comment from Scandinavia encouraged me a lot. Thanks again. I am now checking the rest of the translation of Chapter 2. I think I will try to find a publisher. If it isn't successful I will upload the translation on the website. Please stop by from time to time.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 2:20 AM, August 25, 2005  

The Insensitive Man: A Philosophical Essay on Male Sexuality: Comments

The following are comments on "The Insensitive Man: A Philosophical Essay on Male Sexuality (2005) " in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

___________________________________________
  • By Masahiro_Morioka, at 6:52 PM, June 20, 2005  

  • I don't know how I missed this one when I've been here before, but BRAVO for speaking up on the subject how our sexual fetishes and fantasies shape our lives.

    I would like to say, first of all, that miniskirts for me are one of the biggest turn-ons as well and am so happy to be offered this opportunity to let it out, regardless of what others might think. But I think miniskirts turn me on for a different reason.

    Living in the US, where most people are out of shape, not a lot of women wear miniskirts because of issues they have with their appearance. Of course, many would not wear them under any circumstances, no matter what they look like. And there are some who will wear them and not worry about the fact that they are architecturally compatible.

    It is not common dress, I think, because of the stigma attached to the physical appearance. Occasionally more mature women in business will use them to manipulate men on a genetic/cellular level.

    I used to have a friend I loved to visit with, because she wore a lot of them. She would go on and on about her issues, and I would keep the conversation going just to watch her in her miniskirt. I'd go shopping with her just to watch her try them on etc. I'm embarassed to talk about that being married with children now.

    When a woman is wearing a miniskirt there is a certain nuance of style and gesture that makes them appear as if they have transcended the problems that beset the physical body, like a fakir walking on fire. They are doing something that fear stops other women from doing.

    In other words, a miniskirt can be a talisman worn by a woman to show she is superior to her peers. And from that standpoint I get aroused by miniskirts because I feel they are symbols of transcendental being, unaffected by biology or philosophy. Not necessarily something pure, but something strong and free.

    The miniskirt was designed, however, for slim and young women, and somehow reminds me of a woman wearing a man’s shirt or sweater after sex, which is another turn on. On the other hand, they started as dancing clothes, which basically make them packaging for women attending modern mating rituals, just as young men’s suits and jackets are designed to exaggerate their biological-role features. The mini says to my hormones “this woman is available for mating” and to my mind "she is not confusing".

    The young and slim idea does represent a certain vulnerability, but we don't have the kind of school uniforms that we see in Manga/Anime. I know them mostly through the designs of Anna Sui and Betsy Johnson and other fashion designers. They have, at times, caused me to doubt my own pro-feminist ethics. But I think that I have begun to come to terms with these waves of 'misknowledge' that screw around with my internal chemistry.

    By Roy Kirkland, at 5:43 PM, July 20, 2005  

  • Thank you Roy for your excellent comment on mini skirts. I didn't talk about that aspect in my book, but it is interesting indeed. I regret that my analysis of mini skirts in Chapter 1 was somewhat shallow. However, Chapter 2 and subsequent chapters are more interesting, so please look forward to them.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 10:17 PM, July 20, 2005  

  • What I miss in this article is a distiction about ejaculation while having looked at pornography and ejaculation after a lovingful moment of whatever how many minutes with a person you love. In other words, I believe in a philosofical part of orgasm, which is absolutely not there while looking at pornography. There is e great difference in orgasm while having looked at porn-pics or movies and experiencing orgasm with someone you love.
    I am not sure that all men grow the same attitude towards orgasm (or sex for that matter) through pornography. I myself do not think I have changed much over the years in that aspect, but you should ask my wife that question. Nor has my way of looking at, or ideas about love, which has always been a bit of a struggle.
    The real talk should be about that difference, but I am not planning to tell much more about my point of view in this subject, here on the internet. Yet I think that there should be dome some real research, and I wouldn't mind to participate.

    Funny where dutch weblogs bring you... (-

    greetings

    By Paul Bernhard, at 6:28 AM, December 09, 2005  
  • Ejaculation with porn is hollow and empty, true. Ejaculation inside your wife, whom you cherish and love more than anything in the world, is truly bliss. I wouldn't trade it for anything. Joel

    By Anonymous, at 4:41 PM, February 12, 2006  

  • Hi! My internet name is Keenagain, and I am a doctor of medicine from scandinavia. I read the two first chapters of your book, "The Insensitive Man ". I just felt like leaving a comment here, as I found it very interesting reading. Although you are talking about your own experiences, I think a lot of people , including my self have a lot of the same thoughts as you do on these topics. I am waiting with great anticipation for the following chapters of your book! I hope that it will be possible to one day buy the hardcopy of the english version. The thoughts you are describing were as if you had taken them straight out of my mind! Continue the good work! Regards,Keenagain

    By keenagain, at 12:25 AM, August 25, 2005  

  • Thank you, keenagain! I am very happy to hear your heartfelt comment on my book. In Japan there have been many comments and book reviews on this book since publication, and many of them were affirmative ones about the author's basic point of view. Your comment from Scandinavia encouraged me a lot. Thanks again. I am now checking the rest of the translation of Chapter 2. I think I will try to find a publisher. If it isn't successful I will upload the translation on the website. Please stop by from time to time.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 2:20 AM, August 25, 2005  

Cross-cultural Approaches to the Philosophy of Life in the Contemporary World: From Bioethics to Life Studies: Comments

The following are comments on "Cross-cultural Approaches to the Philosophy of Life in the Contemporary World: From Bioethics to Life Studies" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

___________________________________________

Please see my past blog posts:

http://www.lifestudies.org/weblog/2005/09/eastwest_dichotomy_and_its_cri.html

and

http://www.lifestudies.org/weblog/2005/09/alternative_to_bioethics.html

Comparative Study of the History of Bioethics: Comments

The following are comments on "Comparative Study of the History of Bioethics" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

The Concept of Inochi: A Philosophical Perspective on the Study of Life: Comments

The Following are comments on "The Concept of Inochi: A Philosophical Perspective on the Study of Life: Comments" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

___________________________________________

"and onwards I go..." Thanks, I read it and will continue on in my search

By Anonymous, at 3:46 AM, July 01, 2005

Toward International and Cross-cultural Bioethics: Comments

The following are comments on "Toward International and Cross-cultural Bioethics: Comments." Please feel free to post your comments.

Bioethics and Japanese Culture: Brain Death, Patients' Rights, and Cultural Factors: Comments

The following are comments on "Bioethics and Japanese Culture: Brain Death, Patients' Rights, and Cultural Factors: Comments." Please feel free to post your comments.

Brain Dead Person: From the View Point of Life Studies: Comments

The following are comments on "Brain Dead Person: From the Viewpoint of Life Studies" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

___________________________________________
  • By Masahiro_Morioka, at 7:11 PM, June 20, 2005  

  • This book hits upon many of the same thoughts and feelings I have about brain death, and my thoughts and feelings come from experiencing the brain death of my 18-year-old son after a car accident. You can read my story at http://forums.delphiforums.com/corner2

    By Anonymous, at 4:11 PM, June 26, 2005  

  • Hi! Thank you for your comment. I have just visited your site. I will read the posts and comments carefully.

    Various emotions, feelings, and thoughts on brain dead persons can be found in Japanese books and articles too, indeed there are many voices (probably) compared with those in the US. We have more than 2 hundred books on brain death written in Japanese. By the way, The chapter 7 of "Brain Dead Person" will be uploaded soon. I plan to publish the abridged edition of "Brain Dead Person" in the form of free PDF file.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 12:57 AM, June 28, 2005  

  • Hi!
    I've just completed the reading of "Brain Dead Person" (chapters 2,5,7), so I've posted a recap on my Blog, hope you won't mind the exposure. Especially, the idea of science constantly focusing on irreplaceability from the standpoint of someone directly involved is interesting, and you have developed this idea in many stimulating ways of seeing + feeling. Once again, thanks!
    Abridged PDF version of the book would be great! If I can lend a hand for the translation in French (for free, of course), I'd be happy to help! Let me know...
    Regards,
    Catherine (France)
    http://ethictransplantation.blogspot.com/2005/12/japan-brain-dead-person-from-viewpoint.html

    By Catherine, at 2:43 AM, December 07, 2005  

  • Dear Catherine

    Thank you for your comment. I appreciate your proposal. Let me know your email address. My email address:
    http://www.lifestudies.org/feedback.html

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 8:56 AM, December 08, 2005

  • What is Life Studies: Comments

    The following are comments on "What is Life Studies: Comments" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

    ___________________________________________
    • Peace unto all... Let me more actively participate for universal brotherhood. Why dont you suggest me a group which devoted their life for the same.

      Warm regards to Life studies team.

      By Arekepudi Suresh, at 9:57 PM, October 15, 2005  

    • let me meet you

      By Arekepudi suresh, at 10:02 PM, October 15, 2005  

    • your study intrigues me...
      but i admit that to study life is to study something that goes on continuously but has no pattern. I am more intrigued that you shall study something that surpass all of you. I pray that you do not underestimate the content of life...for sometimes...life kicks you in the ass.

      By Anonymous, at 6:47 PM, December 17, 2005  

    Discussion on the morality of eating meat and humans: Comments

    The following are comments on "Discussion on the morality of eating meat and humans: Comments" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

    ___________________________________________
    • I dont eat any sea food, and i eat a tiny bit of meat every week. I hate meat and i hate fish. I eat mainly vegetables, fruit etc

      By Anonymous, at 5:22 AM, January 28, 2005  

    • Thank you. I don't eat meat, but I eat fish and vegitables. I plan to write a paper on this topic in the near future. It is interesting to think about why people hate to eat human's meat even when he/she has died naturally.

      By Masahiro_Morioka, at 12:00 PM, January 28, 2005  

    • Anyone that doesnt eat meat is f****** wierd dude.

      By Anonymous, at 7:44 AM, April 26, 2005  

    • If I were a regular meat eater I think it is justified to eat the comatose patient. If the comatose patient can be cut into something like a beef jerky without any sign of a living thing, I wouldn't mind eating it. Before killing the patient though we should also make sure that loss of this person will not cause depression for anyone of his family/friends.

      By Anonymous, at 7:20 AM, June 17, 2005  

    • I don't eat mammal meat.
      To eat or not to eat a comatose patient is a toatlly diffrent thing. That would be cannabilism. It is different.

      By distill, at 8:48 PM, July 27, 2005  

    • We can approach the issue of the consumption of human flesh on similar levels as the preservation of memories.

      One would not break or lose an antique vase. This is due to the high sentimental value attached to the object. One would not set fire to a letter from one's deceased grandparents, but would gladly send a flyer from a marketer to the shredder. This is because we, as human beings, have a tendency to preserve ourselves. Our memories being part of ourselves, we do not wish to destroy them.

      So we can link our lack of taste for human flesh to self-preservation: We would not eat our own living flesh, because it is a part of us. Some people do have a habit of picking and chewing scabs, because they are detached from their person.

      But what of eating another person? Perhaps this is because we fear loneliness: Who would wish to be locked away from your human kin forever? If we were to eat each other, we would have no safety in numbers. Again, self preservation.

      But what of a dead human being? We can link this to self preservation: Having consciences, we are inclined to respect our human brethren and their property, that we do not offend them and are risked with rejection. (Leading to lonelinness and lack of safety in numbers) Thus, we do not eat the flesh of a dead human being because we feel it holds sentimental value for the deceased's friends. Fearing to offend these hypothetical people, we do not eat the human flesh.

      Now, on to the subject of justifying the consumption of a cow. Unlike human flesh, the dead cow does not in any way trigger the safety in numbers switch. The cow is incapable of granting any companionship out of its will as default behavior. However, we would hesitate to eat our neighbor's pet cat, because it holds sentimental value for our neighbor, and we do not want to risk offending them. (And up the comes loneliness and safety in numbers behavior) Similarly, some people feel uncomfortable eating pork whilst petting a pig. This is because we feel we risk threats from the pig.

      Yah.

      By Anonymous, at 3:34 PM, September 11, 2005  

    • there is a fourth argument to the meat debate.
      Someone chooses not to eat meat because it has been proven to be a more healthy lifestyle.
      that's it. not because they don't like the taste or because they sincerely believe that meat is not needed.
      it definately takes more effort to get all of the protein, minerals and vitamins that you need when you don't eat meat.
      and we really don't know until we see for ourselves if it will benefit our health.
      so i see why people just eat beef, chicken etc.
      no big deal. how about we all try to eat healthier and teach our children how to eat healthier and then just do what we want :)
      Love Emily

      By Anonymous, at 8:01 AM, November 10, 2005  

    • i dont eat any meat at all. i have 2 take pills and vitamins. i have 2 get shots sometimes also to get the stuff meat gives. i think its soooooo sad that ppl would kill an animal just 2 eat them.

      By Anonymous, at 10:02 AM, November 15, 2005  

    • I believe that the answer to this age old question is found right in the bible: (Rom 14)If it bothers your concience then it is wrong for you. If someone eats with a clear concience, then it is ok for them. This is for animals only (as God has provided them for this purpose) The eating of human flesh would of course be contrary to what the bible says. So I suppose the question for some of you will be whether or not there is a God, and if so, is the bible from Him?

      By Anonymous, at 5:45 AM, February 13, 2006  

    Brain Death Materials: Commentary

    The following are comments on "Brain death related materials" This  and other pages. Please feel free to post your comments.

    ___________________________________________
  • Hi Mr. Morioka,
    I'm from France, Paris, and I wanted to thank you for the advice you gave me, regarding how to ask French transplant-medicine community about brain death ethics (showing them Dr. Shewmon's studies).
    I've described the current situation in my Blog :
    Controversies and updates in French organ transplantation ethics. Here is the link :
    http://ethictransplantation.blogspot.com/2005/09/

    I've just adressed these issues as you advised I should do. Let's hope the French Senate and some representatives among the French transplant-medicine community will answer ! I will let you know.
    I enjoyed reading your translation-in-progress from your Japanese book: "Painless Civilization". Please continue: I cannot speak Japanese to save my life!
    With my best personal regards
    Catherine Coste

    By Catherine, at 9:31 PM, September 02, 2005  

  • I belive that when i become brain dead I would want to have the plug pulled,wouldn't you?

    By Anonymous, at 6:06 PM, May 25, 2005  

  • no, because my son had tears roll as he cried, and moved his head from side to side even though his doctors said he was brain dead

    By peggysue, at 10:39 AM, September 08, 2005  

  • I do not believe that a person should be taken off of life support when prononced brain dead....I believe that the docters should try and keep him/her alive until they know....without a dought that they are not coming back....but as of today I have never seen an instance where they waited and administraighted drugs to keep them alive. Instead they are quick to take the orgin's. I see it as ...if the first coma paitent wasn't waited on and cared for ...no one would know that a coma paitent can awake. Same with brain dead...but no one has actually waited it out completely. Waited out and done everything they could to keep the heart beating and the lungs breathing. There are drugs that keep those bodly orgins working, it is when they take those drugs away that the heart and other orgins stop. Nevertheless, the docters always give the paitents drugs to keep all orgins in the best shape....for transplant...it is when the family says 'NO"I do not want the orgins donated. Well thats when the drugs stop. So you can see the way the medical system works. You donate...you are kept alive....You dont donate....they really dont care and they let you die.

    By Anonymous, at 8:15 PM, October 09, 2005  

  • With all the medical technology WHY cant they bring a person back from being brain dead??????

    By Anonymous, at 8:17 PM, October 09, 2005  

  • I would want to be kept alive until they come up with something that brings me back

    By Anonymous, at 8:18 PM, October 09, 2005  

  • Hi! The basic philosophy behind this paper is fully illustrated in my book, "Brain Dead Person" (1989). You can read the translated text here:

    http://www.lifestudies.org/braindeadperson00.html

    Please visit.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 10:38 PM, October 10, 2005  

  • In a novel written around 1979, a novelist from Bangladesh, Selina Hossain, highlights the issue of the brain dead person. The title of the novel in Bangla is "Mogno Chaitanye Shish", which can be roughly translated as "A melody in the entranced mind". In the novel, published in Bengali, the family of the brain dead person is deeply traumatised by the suffering of the patient, and want the doctors to pull the plug. However, the lover of this person wants to keep the life support system on for as long as possible, probably clinging to the hope that the person can be brought back to life. The novelist obviously sympathises with the lover's view, which she portrays as the humanistic position, with its intrinsic deep respect for life, even at its dying moments. However, I was not sure as a reader, whether the family's viewpoint could not also be considered as socially natural and also deeply respectful of the necessity to minimise suffering. Aptly, the novelist ends the novel with ethical ambiguities, which raises thoughts and questions in the readers' minds.

    By Irshad, at 12:27 PM, May 08, 2006  

  • How did Japanese Netizens Respond to the World Trade Center Attack? :Comments

    The following are comments on "How did Japanese Netizens Respond to the World Trade Center Attack? :Comments" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

    ___________________________________________

    hy Masahiro, 4 years has passed since the attacks, I have stopped thinking about this fact, I just listen to the news, to the different opinions and so on, but nothing else touches me. What ´s going on? The situation in Iraq is so miserabel, the news so confusing. What is happeneing there in big politics, does not interest me anymore, who can there look through? Atall one can wish and pray only for a more peaceful world, whatever this is! Harry

    By harrys blog, at 6:46 AM, January 31, 2006

    Painless Civilization: A Philosophical Critique of Desire: Comments

    The following are comments on "Painless Civilization: A Philosophical Critique of Desire" and other papers on "painless civilization" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

    ___________________________________________
  • Please translate soon - I would love to read your book! I am a zen student in Japan and my master's wife recommended your book!

    By Jill Morrison, at 8:43 PM, May 27, 2005  

  • Thank you, Jill. I will try to start translating "Painless Civilization" again this summer. Please visit here again.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 8:27 PM, May 28, 2005  

  • Hah! I wish my Japanese were better so that I could finish the book!

    This is an absolutely frightening scenario! Who benefits from the painless civilization - the people who make money from the drugs and massive hypnosis machine and slow poison purveyors that keep modern civilization in a psychically comatose state, bathing them with adequate anti-intellectual propaganda to make sure they are well insulated against any siege of reality that may threaten their towers?

    I read an article back in the early 80's by Issac Asimov (in the LA Times of all places) about the anti-intellectual bias in the US, and it has only gotten worse since then. It is rare to hear the voice of reason anymore, much less the voice of wisdom.

    But here we are, just like the characters in the Sci-Fi movie Matrix - looking at the millions of 'Batteries' whose dreams of illusory loves, conflicts, power and the future power the movement of energy throughout the world, while I had to be one of the ones who took the 'red pill'.

    Really - where is the room for integrity - does just the indivial moral meter matter, or is ther a point of compromise or intersection between the individual meaning of things and the laws of man which were designed to serve the powerful by keeping society in order?

    Do we act with Inochi in mind, or go for the painlessness that is far more attractive than the path of a truthseeker? How do we judge ethics in an essentially unethical context? Is it possible to muster the fearlessness to live in a way that is uncompromising, or for that matter, is it desirable?

    I do not speak from an acedemic perspective, but only from an experiential one. My daily delimmas are usually about keeping quiet while everyone around me is only maintaining the painless state - should I wake the kids up to Sponge Bob and Inu Yasha, or let them dream the dreams of power fun and dread that kids dream - and above all - should I 'give them the red pill' and spoil ther conditioning before it takes root - and consign them to lonliness througout their teenage years?

    By Roy Kirkland, at 11:54 AM, June 16, 2005  

  • Dear Roy
    Thank you for your comment. I feel I will have to start translation as soon as possible.... Readers of the Japanese version of "Painless Civilization" often say this worldview somehow resembles that of "Matrix", but I don't think so, because in Matrix the world is devided between "us" and "them," and we fight against them, a popular idea among Hollywood movies, but in "Painless Civilization," "they" are the other side of "us," so we fight against oueselves in a very strict sense. A philosophical analysis of this situation constitues the main part of the book "Painless Civilization." Please wait for translation....

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 12:35 AM, June 17, 2005  
  • hi, i'm a korean reader of this book, "Painless Civilization".
    this book is so impressive to me.
    now, i'm reading the part of death, chapter 7.
    i see the first time that explanation of feeling about death in childhood 'memory' in this kind of book.
    and may i ask some Q?
    the cover of this book(this korean translation) looks like something classic or stubbornness.
    is this your intention?
    i think mostly korean not raise this book by this cover.
    but i think this cover is so contents.

    By Anonymous, at 10:16 AM, June 17, 2005  

  • Hi! Thank you for posting your comment. Chapter 7 is the core part of this book. I would like to know how you think about this part. As to the cover of the Korean translation, that design was made by the Korean publisher. I had nothing to do with the cover as well as the translated contents. I don't know whether this is a good translation or not, eithrer.

    By the way, I didn't know almost nothing about the readers' responses to this book, reputations, or criticisms in Korea. (I have read two book reviews in newspapers via web translation). How have this book accepted in Korea? If you know something please let us know.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 12:26 PM, June 17, 2005  

  • Masahiro,
    I notice your site mentions that an English translation of "Painless Civilization" is in progress. Do you have any idea when this will be published ? The other day I saw a documentary called "surplus", centred around the controversial anti-globalisation guru, John Zerzan. Are you familiar with his ideas ? What are your thoughts?

    By maemuki, at 2:27 PM, June 23, 2005  

  • maemuki,
    The translation of my "Painless Civilization" will be restarted this summer. This is a very thick book, so it takes a lot of time to finish, I am afraid. But I think I have to do it myself....

    I didn't know about John Zerzan. I have just read about him on the web, but I feel his idea is different from my "painless civilization." His philosophy is too simplistic to analyze contemporary civilizaion.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 10:30 PM, June 23, 2005  

  • Roy,
    have you read, "Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy, and Religion in the Matrix", after reading your comments I think you may enjoy it.

  •  By maemuki, at 6:54 PM, July 07, 2005  
  •  

  • Hello - I am very much looking forward to your translation into English. On the topic of self-domestication, you may enjoy the following:

    Rogue Primate: An Exploration of Human Domestication - won a governor's general award in Canada in 1995.

    Why We Lie: By David Livingstone Smith - 2004. It talks about self-deception.

    Also a DVD documentary Frontline Persuaders.

    watch it free here:
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/persuaders/

    By Wayne, at 2:14 AM, November 26, 2005  

  • Thank you for your comment, Wayne. I am going to resume the translation of Painless Civilization soon. Please visit here again in the near future.

    And thank you for your information. I will read them.

    Human self-domestication is a really interesting topic.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 10:15 AM, November 26, 2005  

  • Hello Masahiro,

    I’m very interested in the pervasive indifference to life that seems to be so rife today and which is played out in the analogy you draw in Painless Civilisation.

    I am an Australian student and I see this enveloping quality of society and the dulling effect it seems to have on people in frightening clearness amongst my peers. The commoditisation of desire and sexuality is having the effect of embedding deep-seated numbness in young people: a disinterest in both themselves and others characterised by an obsessive relationship with passion and physicality.

    I would like to write a book on desire and delusion and how this fog of apathy has wrought new meanings for these states. I hope that I will be able to read more of your book in the future; there is much to be said about this state you describe as being wrapped in a translucent film that we all appear to be living in.

    Philosophy and the narrative toil side by side on the road towards a more reasonable world.

    Matt K

    By Matt K., at 8:53 AM, December 05, 2005  

  • Thank you, Matt K.

    I appreciate your comment. I will try to put more translation of my works on this website in the near future, so please visit from time to time. I think "painless civilization" is now growing bigger in every part of the world. I hope your future book will be successful.

    By Masahiro_Morioka, at 1:09 PM, December 06, 2005  

  • hy Masahiro, I first saw this thought in Wittgenstein in his mixed comments, but I don´t think that you have read it there. The painless society! Have we not first to define what pain is? People always start working on stuff without clearing the ground. This society I am living in , the German , tends to make veverything easy, that´s their definition of beeing plainless, but not easy for everyone, some who do not apt to the system has to suffer badly.
    At all can we really control pain? We try to, by drugs, by even spiritual activities, by everything that seems to be represented by a intellegent person. We can hardly bare anymore stress. We are not even educated to bear pain. Life has become nervous, i do not why, maybe due to all our effort to reduce pain! People work for the sake that they live more comfortable, but more ever pain is not anymore defined personally , but by society!
    dear masahiro, your thoughts inspired me, also inspired me to take up some pain, thanks for that. harry

    By harrys blog, at 5:03 AM, January 28, 2006  

  • The book name is Chinese. I can transfer for you "Painless Civilization无痛文明"

    By Anonymous, at 1:45 PM, March 02, 2006

  • The Structure of the Inner Life of a Philosopher: The Multi-Layered Aspects of Speech: Comments

    The following are comments on "The Structure of the Inner Life of a Philosopher: The Multi-Layered Aspects of Speech" in a former blog thread. Please feel free to post your comments.

    ___________________________________________

    • “There are, indeed, things that cannot be put into words. They make themselves manifest. They are what is mystical.”

      When someone confronts death, someone else’s death or her own, fear and evasion is the typical behaviour. We wake up in the moment of the confrontation with the truth that we are mortal and then, being extremely vexed by this, we escape from it, going back to sleep. In sleep, we forget everything or we can believe in the dreams, which claim that we can live eternally. The world becomes a sleeping bag, with our beliefs, worries and greed. No one wakes up to realize that particular moment she exists in. Because she is taught that this very moment is petty and no matter of concern. That is why, I guess, one does not become aware that everyday, she kills and dies for the sake of the things which are told to be important, great and necessary for her. Then the moments of life become petty, insipid, meaningless, just as the lives of the sleepwalkers. It is hard to bear the very moment of the contemporary life. It is even harder to breath in the poisoned air that no sleeper is aware of.

      To die is to be absent. Whether you are asleep or you are concerned with the past or the future so you can not get involved in at the moment, you are dead. If you can grasp, realize, cherish and give meaning to the present time, then you are alive.

      To die is to be lost in abstraction. Words and numbers are killers if we do not use them consciously. Words and numbers rule our lives. To get rid of the “annoyance” caused by an actual being and get back safely to sleep, we name it or number it.


      Ozgurel

      By Anonymous, at 8:55 PM, August 26, 2004  

    • Thank you Ozgurel.

      I discussed "death of myself" again in the recent book, Painless Civilization (2003), Chapter 7. You might want to see the index of the book on the books page of INLS. But actually, I think I will discuss one more time in a future book because I am not satisfied with it.

      By Masahiro_Morioka, at 10:46 PM, October 24, 2004  

    • hy dear masahiro, you should read Wittgenstein in German, he has a great style, it´s a pity that the translations cannot apt to his style. harry

      By harrys zen, at 6:14 AM, February 02, 2006